Tag Archives: culture

Workshop on Visual Methods in Aarhus

via Anne Marit Waade

The University of Aarhus is holding a PhD workshop on Visual Culture and Visual Methods, June 10-16. Exploring innovative approaches to practice and artefact-based research, participants will have an introductory session with keynotes before embarking to Northside music festival as their research location.

We will use the festival as a laboratory for different types of empirical studies. We will focus on the exploration of how visual impressions and expressions, including digital visual media (such as Instagram, mobile camera, website) interweaves with (maybe reinforces, maybe contradicts?) the participant’s experience of the music festival.

Keynote speakers are

  • Sarah Pink, Professor in Design Research Institute, School of Media and Communications at RMIT, Melbourne, Australia
  • Annette Markham, Affiliate Professor of Digital Ethics&  Communication, Loyola University, Chicago, and Associate Professor in Information
    Studies, Aarhus University
  • Anne Marit Waade, Associate Professor, Media studies, Dept. of Aesthetics &  Communication, Aarhus University, Denmark

Apply by April 1 via the workshop website.

 

Featured with pleasure on raetzsch.berlin

The Network Celebrity

Fred Turner and Christine Larson, both researchers at Stanford University, have just published an article in Public Culture on a new type of celebrity – the network intellectuals. Discussing the examples of Norbert Wiener, Stuart Brand and Tim O’Reily, the authors present a compelling account of how opinion leadership is both outcome of network effects and entrepreneurial zest to create those networks and opportunities in the first place.

In their historical and iconographic review of Wiener, O’Reilly and Brand, the authors find that the network intellectual is both a spokesperson, who condenses interests not yet formulated as an agenda, as someone who is actively pursuing to build a community to support his (or her) interests and who is committed to spreading a worldview beyond those circles.

Their power and their celebrity no longer come from the ability to express ideas in words or the ability of mass media technologies to broadcast images around the world. Rather, they come from the ability to build new social networks, to generate new ideas, new language, and new identities within them and, ultimately, to promulgate these networks’ labors—all in such a way that entrepreneurs can come to stand before the public as emblems of the worlds they have helped create. Celebrities in this model are hardly empty vessels. Rather, they are full to the brim with the cultural assumptions and social aspirations of the communities they represent (p. 80)

Turner, Fred, & Larson, Christine. (2015). “Network Celebrity: Entrepreneurship and The New Public Intellectuals.” Public Culture 27(1): 53-84. doi:10.1215/08992363-2798343

Further reading: