All posts by Raetzsch

Workshop on Visual Methods in Aarhus

via Anne Marit Waade

The University of Aarhus is holding a PhD workshop on Visual Culture and Visual Methods, June 10-16. Exploring innovative approaches to practice and artefact-based research, participants will have an introductory session with keynotes before embarking to Northside music festival as their research location.

We will use the festival as a laboratory for different types of empirical studies. We will focus on the exploration of how visual impressions and expressions, including digital visual media (such as Instagram, mobile camera, website) interweaves with (maybe reinforces, maybe contradicts?) the participant’s experience of the music festival.

Keynote speakers are

  • Sarah Pink, Professor in Design Research Institute, School of Media and Communications at RMIT, Melbourne, Australia
  • Annette Markham, Affiliate Professor of Digital Ethics&  Communication, Loyola University, Chicago, and Associate Professor in Information
    Studies, Aarhus University
  • Anne Marit Waade, Associate Professor, Media studies, Dept. of Aesthetics &  Communication, Aarhus University, Denmark

Apply by April 1 via the workshop website.

 

Featured with pleasure on raetzsch.berlin

Selfie Citizenship – Workshop in Manchester

via Adi Kuntsman

A Research Workshop on Selfie Citizenship

16 April 2015, @The Shed, Digital Innovation, Manchester Metropolitan University

Organised by Adi Kuntsman, Farida Vis and Simon Faulkner

Sponsored by Digital Innovation, Manchester Metropolitan University, and The Visual Social Media Lab, The University of Sheffield

https://sites.google.com/site/selfiecitizenship/home

The workshop brings together researchers from a variety of disciplines, fields and backgrounds to explore the notion of “selfie citizenship” — the growing use of the selfie-genre and, more broadly, the networked circulations of individual and group self-portraits for “acts of citizenship” (Isin 2008).

In the recent years we have become accustomed to photographs of individuals with hand-written banners, as well as to various selfie memes and hashtag actions (#NoMakeUpSelfie, #WeAreAllClean, #SmearforSmear as well as #ICan’tBreathe, #BlackLivesMatter and #UseMeInstead, to mention just a few), spread on social media as actions of protest and political or social statements. Their circulation is global, and their iconography is often deceivingly similar, yet their motivations, causes and context vary – some stand against police abuse or military occupation, others call for clearer cities or smaller classrooms, yet others promote a charity cause or a social awareness, and there are those that incite violence or call for a war.  Further, while some perform citizenship as a form of nationalism, other mobilise notions of global citizenship, and yet others operate in contexts where citizenship is absent, in question or violently denied.

Such mobilisation of the selfie genre – understood broadly as self-portraits in viral digital circulation – clearly challenges the prevalent popular view of selfies as narcissistic, inherently a-political and even anti-social. Yet selfie citizenship still remains to be theorised, both as a framework for different understanding of selfies, and as a way to think differently about citizenship in the social media age. This workshop was set up to create a space for an intellectual and political conversation around the notion of selfie citizenship, bringing together scholars of visual culture, social and digital media, and cultural citizenship, into a much needed dialogue that explores the work of selfies, but also charts new directions to think about citizenship as a political, affective, visual and networked phenomenon.

Supported with pleasure by raetzsch.berlin

The Network Celebrity

Fred Turner and Christine Larson, both researchers at Stanford University, have just published an article in Public Culture on a new type of celebrity – the network intellectuals. Discussing the examples of Norbert Wiener, Stuart Brand and Tim O’Reily, the authors present a compelling account of how opinion leadership is both outcome of network effects and entrepreneurial zest to create those networks and opportunities in the first place.

In their historical and iconographic review of Wiener, O’Reilly and Brand, the authors find that the network intellectual is both a spokesperson, who condenses interests not yet formulated as an agenda, as someone who is actively pursuing to build a community to support his (or her) interests and who is committed to spreading a worldview beyond those circles.

Their power and their celebrity no longer come from the ability to express ideas in words or the ability of mass media technologies to broadcast images around the world. Rather, they come from the ability to build new social networks, to generate new ideas, new language, and new identities within them and, ultimately, to promulgate these networks’ labors—all in such a way that entrepreneurs can come to stand before the public as emblems of the worlds they have helped create. Celebrities in this model are hardly empty vessels. Rather, they are full to the brim with the cultural assumptions and social aspirations of the communities they represent (p. 80)

Turner, Fred, & Larson, Christine. (2015). “Network Celebrity: Entrepreneurship and The New Public Intellectuals.” Public Culture 27(1): 53-84. doi:10.1215/08992363-2798343

Further reading:

The Nodes in Academic Publishing

Back in 2010, Nicholas Knouf developed a visualization of journals belonging to Elsevier, John Wiley & Sons, Taylor & Francis, and Springer among others. His findings were published in Vol. 1, No. 1 of the open access Journal of Journal  Performance Studies, a publication created expressly for this task that never saw a second issue.

In total, Knouf analyzed 16,000 journals, rendering transparent what many scholars knew for a long time. The publishing of academic journals shows similar signs of concentration like other industries handling time-sensitive goods. The irony is of course that knowledge used to mature in far slower intervals, in which the quarterly appearance of a journal was merely a way to test new ideas and present preliminary findings. Before the book was out. Now, articles online “ahead of print” are already cited by colleagues before their author ever hold a printed copy in their hands. It’s online first (and soon only).

 

via Rogue Scholar Research Group

Support the “World Hobbit Project”

Reposted call from Martin Barker (mib@aber.ac.uk):

The “World Hobbit Project” is a seriously ambitious attempt to gather responses right across the world to the films of The Hobbit with the aim of being able to explore both the patterning of the reception of the films (against many variables [country, language, age, sex, educational level, kind of work]) but also to open up an investigation into the changing position of ‘fantasy’ in contemporary culture.

With just a very small research grant from the UK’s British Academy, research partners in 47 countries agreed on a complex quali-quantitative questionnaire, which is currently recruiting responses in 33 languages at this address:

www.worldhobbitproject.org.

There are already 27,500 responses but we do need more, to be sure that we can with confidence make cross-cultural comparisons, and we have absolutely no money for publicising the project.  We will be hugely grateful if colleagues could help in different ways:

  • complete the survey yourself, if you have seen the films.
  • pass on this information to students, colleagues, family, friends, and asking them to do the same.
  • mention and point to the project’s address in blogs, postings, and conversations.

What can we offer in return?  All our findings will be made publicly available, in as many forms as we are able; and once we have completed our own work on the database, the entire body of data and materials will be placed in the public domain for other researchers to use in whatever way they choose.

Best wishes, and thanks everyone

Martin Barker (mib@aber.ac.uk)

Find the World Hobbit Project on:
– WordPress:http://globalhobbitca.wordpress.com/
– Facebook:https://www.facebook.com/WorldHobbitProject
– Twitter:https://twitter.com/WorldHobbit
– Pinterest:http://www.pinterest.com/ghobbit/
– Tumblr:http://world-hobbit.tumblr.com/
– Youtube:https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCYsI3JEi8iwK4nCCsZin_4Q/playlists

Supported with pleasure by raetzsch.berlin