Workshop on Visual Methods in Aarhus

via Anne Marit Waade

The University of Aarhus is holding a PhD workshop on Visual Culture and Visual Methods, June 10-16. Exploring innovative approaches to practice and artefact-based research, participants will have an introductory session with keynotes before embarking to Northside music festival as their research location.

We will use the festival as a laboratory for different types of empirical studies. We will focus on the exploration of how visual impressions and expressions, including digital visual media (such as Instagram, mobile camera, website) interweaves with (maybe reinforces, maybe contradicts?) the participant’s experience of the music festival.

Keynote speakers are

  • Sarah Pink, Professor in Design Research Institute, School of Media and Communications at RMIT, Melbourne, Australia
  • Annette Markham, Affiliate Professor of Digital Ethics&  Communication, Loyola University, Chicago, and Associate Professor in Information
    Studies, Aarhus University
  • Anne Marit Waade, Associate Professor, Media studies, Dept. of Aesthetics &  Communication, Aarhus University, Denmark

Apply by April 1 via the workshop website.

 

Featured with pleasure on raetzsch.berlin

Selfie Citizenship – Workshop in Manchester

via Adi Kuntsman

A Research Workshop on Selfie Citizenship

16 April 2015, @The Shed, Digital Innovation, Manchester Metropolitan University

Organised by Adi Kuntsman, Farida Vis and Simon Faulkner

Sponsored by Digital Innovation, Manchester Metropolitan University, and The Visual Social Media Lab, The University of Sheffield

https://sites.google.com/site/selfiecitizenship/home

The workshop brings together researchers from a variety of disciplines, fields and backgrounds to explore the notion of “selfie citizenship” — the growing use of the selfie-genre and, more broadly, the networked circulations of individual and group self-portraits for “acts of citizenship” (Isin 2008).

In the recent years we have become accustomed to photographs of individuals with hand-written banners, as well as to various selfie memes and hashtag actions (#NoMakeUpSelfie, #WeAreAllClean, #SmearforSmear as well as #ICan’tBreathe, #BlackLivesMatter and #UseMeInstead, to mention just a few), spread on social media as actions of protest and political or social statements. Their circulation is global, and their iconography is often deceivingly similar, yet their motivations, causes and context vary – some stand against police abuse or military occupation, others call for clearer cities or smaller classrooms, yet others promote a charity cause or a social awareness, and there are those that incite violence or call for a war.  Further, while some perform citizenship as a form of nationalism, other mobilise notions of global citizenship, and yet others operate in contexts where citizenship is absent, in question or violently denied.

Such mobilisation of the selfie genre – understood broadly as self-portraits in viral digital circulation – clearly challenges the prevalent popular view of selfies as narcissistic, inherently a-political and even anti-social. Yet selfie citizenship still remains to be theorised, both as a framework for different understanding of selfies, and as a way to think differently about citizenship in the social media age. This workshop was set up to create a space for an intellectual and political conversation around the notion of selfie citizenship, bringing together scholars of visual culture, social and digital media, and cultural citizenship, into a much needed dialogue that explores the work of selfies, but also charts new directions to think about citizenship as a political, affective, visual and networked phenomenon.

Supported with pleasure by raetzsch.berlin